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TACTICAL MEDICINE TACMED España

TACTICAL MEDICINE TACMED España
by EMS SOLUTIONS INTERNATIONAL

Facebook Dr. Ramon Reyes, MD

NIVEL DE ALERTA ANITERRORISTA, España

martes, 2 de mayo de 2017

The LTP (Lateral Trauma Position) Why Should You Put Some Trauma Patients on Their Side?

The LTP (Lateral Trauma Position)  Why Should You Put Some Trauma Patients on Their Side?

The LTP (Lateral Trauma Position)
2015 New Hampshire EMS Protocol 4.5 – Spinal Trauma says, “Patients with nausea or vomiting may be placed in a lateral recumbent position. Maintain neutral head position with manual stabilization, padding/pillows, and/or patient’s arm.” The protocol cited above gives us the option to put a patient on their side while maintaining neutral head position in a situation involving nausea or vomiting.
One of the technique is the Norwegian Lateral Trauma Position (LTP). The goal is to transport a trauma patient who is at risk for airway compromise on their side while making reasonable attempts to maintain inline stabilization of the spine and minimize movement.
Don’t do things without authorization from protocols, medical direction, administration – and you know, the legal stuff.
Why Should You Put Some Trauma Patients on Their Side?

Our practice in EMS for decades has been to strap trauma patients to a rigid longboard in a supine position. This has been thought to protect the spine from further injury. We’ve all gotten pretty good at performing that technique, so we’re comfortable doing it.
Unfortunately that comfort is not shared by the patient. Being secured to a ongboard is not comfortable, it’s painful, and it can cause harm to the patient. Furthermore, there is no evidence that it actually makes a difference in patient outcome. So numerous EMS leaders are creating a sea change in EMS across the USA to stop using rigid longboards in the transport of trauma patients.

In 2014-2015 statewide protocols in several New England states took longboards out of the routine care for patients with potential or actual spine trauma. Anecdotal evidence to this point looks very good. However, did we give up anything useful by stopping the practice of transporting patients strapped to a backboard? Let’s think about airway management for a minute. Picture this, you’re in the back of the ambulance with a patient on a backboard. The patient starts to vomit. A lot. How did you manage that? Your suction device wasn’t going to help in this scenario, so as quickly as you could you undid the straps and rolled the patient and backboard up on its side. Gravity then saved the day.

Same scenario, but now we’re NOT transporting the patient on the backboard. How can you roll this patient up on their side and still maintain alignment of the spine? You probably can’t. However airway and breathing come before disability so you do the best you can.
Our state protocols recognize this potential scenario, and say if you think your patient is at risk for vomiting, you should transport them on their side. The language from the 2015 New Hampshire EMS Protocol 4.5 – Spinal Trauma says, “Patients with nausea or vomiting may be placed in a lateral recumbent position. Maintain neutral head position with manual stabilization, padding/pillows, and/or patient’s arm.”

But, but, but, I can’t do that… a trauma patient HAS to be transported supine. Right?
Dogma is defined by the Merriam-Webster dictionary as “a belief or set of beliefs that is accepted by the members of a group without being questioned or doubted”. Maybe the paradigm of transporting every trauma patient in a supine position is dogma that needs to be reconsidered.
The protocol cited above gives us the option to put a patient on their side while maintaining neutral head position in a situation involving nausea or vomiting. This means proactively doing so before initiating transport. THIS IS A VERY GOOD IDEA. There are clearly patients that you can anticipate that vomiting may be in their near future, and you should proactively take steps to deal with it. If endotracheal intubation with RSI, is in your scope of practice that may be the path you take, but transporting the patient on their side may be just as effective and certainly less invasive.
So again, putting a trauma patient who is at risk for aspiration on their side for transport rather than transporting them supine is a very good idea. However we need to do this in a manner that still maintains an inline stabilization of the spine. How do you do that? Good question.
That’s the challenge this project seeks to address. We would like to have a technique that can accomplish that objective.

The Norwegian Lateral Trauma Position


Fortunately our EMS colleagues in Norway developed and have been utilizing a technique called the Lateral Trauma Position for over a decade, with success. What we seek to do here at the LateralTraumaPosition.org project is to take what the Norwegian EMS system started, and help our EMS colleagues in the USA develop this skill. We hope to provide you with information that can help you form your own clinical opinion and your own clinical practice.
This website includes a video that was produced by EMS providers in Norway illustrating the lateral trauma position (LTP) as they practice it. We’ve also included research studies that attempt to determine the effectiveness and safety of the technique. We believe that our practice in EMS should be based on evidence when possible. The current evidence on the LTP isn’t that strong, no randomized controlled trials. But the evidence is growing. This is thanks to the leadership of Dr. Per Kristian Hyldmo, a flight physician for the helicopter EMS system in Norway. We highly admire his work and hope to follow in his footsteps.
The demonstration videos in this website show the LTP as we have worked out the bugs for us. We wouldn’t presume to say this is the only way to do it. What we do say is that EMS providers need to practice a technique that accomplishes the goal, which is to transport a trauma patient who is at risk for airway compromise on their side while making reasonable attempts to maintain inline stabilization of the spine and minimize movement.
We suggest your team starts with our techniques, modifies the techniques to what works for you, then practice it. A lot.
Listen, for years and years we practiced the PHTLS technique of a standing takedown onto a long backboard, right? Well our evolving practice appears to be doing away with that technique, but we should practice the new LTP technique with the same fervor.
So we ask you to review our “how to” videos, practice them with your crews, modify them to suit your needs and your equipment, and get really good at it. We’d really appreciate your feedback and your modifications of the techniques, including photos and videos.
Finally, understand that we’re not holding ourselves out as experts on the topic of spinal immobilization. We are not researchers. We are simply partners in trying to develop an effective technique in the setting of changing protocols and clinical practices.
Oh, and don’t do things without authorization from protocols, medical direction, administration – you know, the legal stuff.

lunes, 1 de mayo de 2017

Drone-Based Emergency Medical Rescue System Presented

Drone-Based Emergency Medical Rescue System Presented
Getting paramedics to a site of an injury can often be challenging if the stricken person is on top of a cliff, in a forest, or some other hard to reach place. Italo Subbarao, DO, senior associate dean at William Carey University College of Osteopathic Medicine, and Guy Paul Cooper Jr., a med student at the college, and others, developed the new drone delivery system that can ferry emergency supplies and a communication system to allow nearby people to treat patients with help of remote physicians.
The system was demonstrated two days ago at the John Bell Airport in Bolton, Mississippi in front of the Governor of that state, as well as officials from the Federal government as well as from the United Nations.
The HiRO (Health Integrated Rescue Operations) drone system delivers a case that includes medical supplies as well as a cellular-connected Google Glass smart glasses. A person near the stricken patient is expected to put on the glasses, which send the video in front of them to a remote physician. The physician can then see what’s going on and lead the deputized civilian through the necessary treatment steps that utilize the supplies in the case.
The HiRO has so far been tried with two package types. One designed to treat a single person, while another meant for mass casualty events.
Check out this video that shows how the system is meant to work:  http://www.medgadget.com/2016/12/drone-based-emergency-medical-rescue-system-presented.html

Ambulance Drone by argodesign


 Ambulancias Drones by argodesign



 Ambulancias Drones by argodesign


Algunos hospitales holandeses ya tienen en funcionamiento ingenios no tripulados que se dedican a transportar plasma y material médico hasta el escenario de accidentes o catástrofes. Pero la gran novedad de este nuevo modelo de dron ambulancia creado por la firma estadounidese Argodesign es que, aunque su vuelo puede dirigirse de forma automática gracias a un sistema de GPS, en el caso de que fuera necesario también puede ser pilotado manualmente por un tripulante. Además de tener espacio para evacuar heridos y transportarlos al hospital más próximo.
 Ambulancias Drones by argodesign

El vehículo tiene el tamaño aproximado de un coche de gama pequeña (tipo Smart) y las cuatro ruedas de las ambulancias tradicionales se han transformado aquí en otras tantas hélices. Su diseño lo hace, además, idóneo para aterrizar en casi cualquier lugar, por inaccesible que resulte.
Los responsables del proyecto explican que el coste de cada unidad rondaría el millón de dólares. Un precio bastante superior al de una ambulancia normal, pero también muy inferior al coste de un helicóptero médico.
Entre sus numerosas ventajas se encuentra el hecho de que, gracias a su práctico sistema de control remoto, un único piloto podría controlar desde la base el trayecto y el recorrido de varias de estas aeroambulancias. Igual que la mayoría de los helicópteros, 300 km/h es la velocidad máxima a la que este vehículo sanitario puede volar.
 Ambulancias Drones by argodesign

Fuente: 



Ambulancia drone by argodesign

Dron Ambulancia "AirMule" capaz de trasladar dos pacientes. Israel

AirMule Ambulance Drone



Primer vuelo de un dron ambulancia capaz de cargar con dos personas

Recientemente el dron AirMule desarrollado por la empresa israelí Tactical Robotics completó su primer vuelo totalmente autónomo. El dron AirMule es capaz de transportar 450 kg de peso a 50 km de distancia.
Una de las aplicaciones previstas para el dron AirMule es la de ambulancia. Su capacidad de vuelo autónoma, sin tripulación, junto con tamaño compacto y pequeños rotores le permite volar y aterrizar a zonas donde los helicópteros no pueden llegar o donde resulta demasiado arriesgado. La capacidad de carga hace posible llevar equipamiento médico, de rescate o de soporte, y si es necesario traer de vuelta dos víctimas.
AirMule Prime Dron Ambulancia capaz de trasladar dos pacientes

On December 30, 2015, Israeli-made AirMule successfully completed its first autonomous, untethered flight at the Megiddo airfield in northern Israel. The AirMule is an unmmaned aerial system capable of lifting 1,000 pounds (450 kg) in weight and can carry its loads for 31 miles (50 km).

OXYMASK tm Nueva Mascarilla Oxigenoterapia. VIDEO Y Fotos

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